Wildlife

These climate change issues and responses are related to impacts on wildlife.

Climate Change Issues

Response

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Climate change is changing the landscape for reindeer pasturing Use satellite imagery of snow change to make decisions about herding.
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Reindeer herders and the Polar View Initiative Polar View website, http://www.polarview.org; European Space Agency (2009, April 10). Satellite Snow Maps Help Reindeer Herders Adapt To A Changing Arctic. ScienceDaily
Changing migration routes of animals Change hunting routes and hunt alternative species moving into the region.
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Parry, M.L., O.F. Canziani, J.P. Palutikof, P.J. van der Linden and C.E. Hanson, Eds., 2007: Cross-chapter case study. In: Climate
Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 843-868.
Researchers are concerned about the resilience and vulnerability of Caribou. Researchers document caribou migration patterns. website
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Circum-Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network (CARMA)
Early melting of sea ice in the spring has made it more difficult to hunt walrus in Alaska. Indigenous communities have begun shifting from walrus skin boats to fabric boats.
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Ministry of the Environment of Finland, Department of Environmental Protection. Indigenous Peoples and Traditional Knowledge Related to Biological Diversity and Responses to Climate Change in the Arctic Region. (page 5)
The possible effects of more shipping traffic in new routes in a partially ice-free Arctic Ocean, apecifically, the introduction of new species could have negative effects on nesting Aleutian Canadian Geese. The National Wildlife Refuge created monitoring partnerships to detect the appearance of invasive species and of contaminants.
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Julius, S. and West, I. (2008) adaptation Options for Climate Sensitive Ecosystems and Resources, Annex A
Drying lakes and changing snow conditions limit the access to subsistence resources and the availability of waterfowl for subsistence. Interior Alaska National Wildlife Refuges worked on projecting possible future conditions and educated users about observed and expected changes. View Source Here:
Julius, S. and West, I. (2008) adaptation Options for Climate Sensitive Ecosystems and Resources, Annex A
Warmer winters do not allow fur-bearers to grow their normally thick winter coats. This results in a lower quality fur that is shorter and not as thick. Less trapping and less use of local furs website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Changing animal migration routes are making hunting more expensive for the people of the Inuvialuit. A settlement Region in Northwestern Canada. Support Elders who can no longer afford to hunt. website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
More mosquitoes and other biting insects are causing more health concerns for the people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in Northwestern Canada. Use more insect repellent and use netting and screens. website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
In Athabascan communities residents have noted changes in distribution of moose and chinook (king) salmon. Residents are harvesting other types of salmon and eating more of other harvested foods (e.g., geese and ducks).
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Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.
Some residents of Grayling, Anvik, Shageluk, Holy Cross, and Beaver, Alaska anticipate a shortage of moose meat. Residents process more chum salmon by smoking and jarring to make up for the shortage of moose meat.
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Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.
Residents of Grayling, Anvik, Shageluk, Holy Cross and Beaver, Alaska, have noted poor travel conditions and changes in animal distribution. Residents have changed harvest locations and continue with traditions of sharing harvests in times of shortage.
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Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.
The changing ocean and coastal environment is changing the distribution of fish and other marine life forms. Both subsistence users and commercial fishermen will have to travel farther distances. website
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United States Global Change Research Program. Alaska Regional Climate Impacts.