Warmer Temperatures

The following illustrates a variety of issues and responses associated with warmer temperatures.

Climate Change Issues

Response

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Warmer temperatures are making it more difficult to store traditional foods in the summer. Community members are traveling back to communities more often in summer in order to store traditional foods, using more fuel and time. Less hunting for future use because of limited storage. website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Earlier break-up is a concern for the people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in Northwestern Canada. Travel to camp at earlier times website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Warmer winters do not allow fur-bearers to grow their normally thick winter coats. This results in a lower quality fur that is shorter and not as thick. Less trapping and less use of local furs website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Concerns about climate change and warming temperatures led to the development of a task force for the Fairbanks North Star Borough based in Fairbanks, Alaska. A report for the Fairbanks North Star Borough identified opportunities for increased growing, construction and tourism seasons. This also noted increased wildfires.
website
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Fairbanks North Star Borough. (2010) Interior Issues Council Climate Change Task Force: Preliminary Vulnerability Assessment Report.
Warmer temperatures are increasing the likelihood of wildfire. Fire is being used to reduce fuel load of potential fire around the village of Huslia, Alaska.
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Huntington, O. Traditional/local Knowledge and Community Sustainability at Huslia on the Koyukuk. Alaska Native Science Commission.
Warmer temperatures affecting sled dogs in Huslia, Alaska. Villagers are now selecting dogs with thinner coats for racing and warmer temperatures.
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Huntington, O. Traditional/local Knowledge and Community Sustainability at Huslia on the Koyukuk. Alaska Native Science Commission.
Warmer temperatures are increasing the length of the growing season. Some residents of Huslia, Alaska are considering agriculture to help replace some declining subsistence resources.
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Huntington, O. Traditional/local Knowledge and Community Sustainability at Huslia on the Koyukuk. Alaska Native Science Commission.
Warmer temperatures are changing seasonal patterns. Subsistence activities are changed to match the conditions of the environment.
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Huntington, O. Traditional/local Knowledge and Community Sustainability at Huslia on the Koyukuk. Alaska Native Science Commission.
In Point Hope, Alaska a concern is that warming temperatures will make changes in the the quality of the food gathered. Residents may experience more hunger and disease. A study identifies adaptations to include keeping track of community diet, food storage and food distribution, and to change subsistence patterns.
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Center for climate and Health. (October 2009). Draft Final: Climate change and health impacts Point Hope, Alaska. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.
In Point Hope and Barrow, Alaska, traditional ice cellars are thawing and could lead to a poorer quality of stored subsistence foods. A study identifies adaptations to include keeping track of community diet, food storage and food distribution, and to change subsistence patterns.
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Center for climate and Health. (October 2009). Draft Final: Climate change and health impacts Point Hope, Alaska. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.
In Point Hope, Alaska, warmer temperatures are delaying ice formation and early thaw. The ice is also thinner and there is less snow. These conditions are leading to increased chances for injury, drowning, a weaker diet, less physical activity and mental health concerns. A study identifies adaptations to include keeping track of changing ice conditions and effects and to increase discussion of Arctic climate adaptation.
View Source Here:
Center for climate and Health. (October 2009). Draft Final: Climate change and health impacts Point Hope, Alaska. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.