Travel

The following issues and responses show how people are responding to changing travel conditions.

Climate Change Issues

Response

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Warmer temperatures are making it more difficult to store traditional foods in the summer for the people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in Northwestern Canada. Community members are traveling back to communities more often in summer in order to store traditional foods, using more fuel and time. Less hunting for future use because of limited storage. website
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Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
The people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in Northwestern Canada are concerned about earlier break-up. Travel to camp at an earlier time. website
View Source Here:
Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Changing water levels and the formation of shifting sand bars make travel difficult for the people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. Find new routes of travel that are usually more expensive. Fly to other communities. website
View Source Here:
Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Changing animal migration routes are making hunting more expensive for the people of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. Support Elders who can no longer afford to hunt. website
View Source Here:
Nickels, S. et al. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research. In Krupnik and Jolly, The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. p. 323
Warmer temperatures affecting sled dogs in Huslia, Alaska. Villagers are now selecting dogs with thinner coats for racing and warmer temperatures.
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Huntington, O. Traditional/local Knowledge and Community Sustainability at Huslia on the Koyukuk. Alaska Native Science Commission.
In Point Hope, Alaska, warmer temperatures are delaying ice formation and early thaw. The ice is also thinner and there is less snow. These conditions are leading to increased chances for injury, drowning, a weaker diet, less physical activity and mental health concerns. A study identifies adaptations to include keeping track of changing ice conditions and effects and to increase discussion of Arctic climate adaptation.
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Center for Climate and Health. (October 2009). Draft Final: Climate change and health impacts Point Hope, Alaska. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.
Shorter seasons and difficult travel conditions were identified as an issue for the people of the lower Yukon River in Alaska. People are seeking more jobs to get more money to buy food from the store. They are also changing the way they harvest food.
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Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.
Changes in the environment are making overland travel more difficult for Athabascan communities on the lower Yukon River in Alaska. Villagers are setting longer trap lines to harvest more animals in one trip and camping out instead of making several day trips.
View Source Here:
Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.
Residents of Grayling, Anvik, Shageluk, Holy Cross and Beaver, Alaska, have noted poor travel conditions and changes in animal distribution. Residents have changed harvest locations and continue with traditions of sharing harvests in times of shortage.
View Source Here:
Carey, E. (2009). Building resilience to climate change in rural Alaska: understanding impacts, adaptation, and the role of TEK. A practicum. University of Michigan.